Arrival – Chris Stuckmann

Chris Stuckmann reviews Arrival.

About ChrisStuckmann

Quick, funny reviews of movies and games, new and old.

6 comments

  1. I’m probably going to see this next weekend.

  2. I never understand why some people think that human linguistic would do translate anything? Maybe in unlikely District 9 scenario but it is almost sure that aliens would be capable easily crack human communication on the first place.. I wouldn’t be surprised if they send fully capable protocol androids from the get go..

    • Yeah, that’s a failure of many movies. Any alien species that come here intentionally and peacefully will almost certainly make strides to learn at least one of our languages first, or be fully prepared with adequate means to do so once they initiate first contact, rather than rely upon us to have to translate their language for effective communication.

      • I would suggest looking at the movie from the perspective of human nature, and how we communicate. This is classic “hard Sci-Fi” which is often an allegory and exploration of who we are as a species and what our potential may be. It’s not about the aliens per se but they give you plenty of them so I was more than satisfied on that account.

        I was reminded strongly of the original Star Trek series, Babylon 5, and a number of the truly great Science Fiction novels by Robert A. Heinlein and Isaac Asimov, but with the benefit of full cinematic storytelling. The symbolism is all there and it takes an intellectual’s approach. If you’ve ever watched Jerome Bixby’s “Man From Earth” and enjoyed it, you get the same “buzz” in your mind with the discussions in the movie.

        The answer to “why they are here” is not knowable in the sense most “grounded” viewers like Chris might want to hear, but definitely not glossed over. As a more abstract thinker myself and a fan of these other science fiction stories, I was blown away by the reveal. The answer is still about language and linguistics, and yes, you NEEDED a human linguistic in this movie to solve this problem.

        Best hard science fiction movie I’ve seen in a VERY long time. For me, for what it is and how it tells its story, it’s an A+.

        • “This is classic “hard Sci-Fi” which is often an allegory and exploration of who we are as a species and what our potential may be.”

          It is soft SF.. after all Soft SF is about humanistic science.

          “It’s not about the aliens per se”

          Because it would be a hard SF.. about the technology itself.

          “I was reminded strongly of the original Star Trek series, Babylon 5”

          Which are Space Opera.. they have right to be silly because they aren’t really SF.

          “number of the truly great Science Fiction novels by Robert A. Heinlein and Isaac Asimov”

          Which are old.. in modern times some things simply can’t be acceptable as SF because it was disproved.

          “The symbolism is all there and it takes an intellectual’s approach.”

          I hope so.. but my nerd sense tingle and that irritate my..

          “The answer is still about language and linguistics, and yes, you NEEDED a human linguistic in this movie to solve this problem.”

          Maybe so.. I just point out obvious fact about many SF movies, in fact not about this specific one particularly.

          “Best hard science fiction movie I’ve seen in a VERY long time.”

          The Martian was not that old (and it has only few mistakes).

        • The “hardness” of sci-fi refers to how realistic it is, not what philosophical aspects it explores. Hard sci-fi is spacecraft with centrifuges for gravity mining asteroids or visiting other planets in the solar system. Soft sci-fi is a starship flying across the galaxy, meeting suspiciously human-looking aliens, and solving their problems with increasingly less meaningful technobabble.

Leave a Reply