Nostalgia Critic: North

A movie so bad and full of horrible stereotypes that Siskel and Ebert said what about it? Tune in to see the Nostalgia Critic review North, and find out the answer!

About Doug Walker

Creator of 5 Second Movies, Nostalgia Critic, Bum Reviews and more.

6 comments

  1. Haven’t seen the movie, but it did not seem that bad, as you and ebert made it.

    Many Scenes are bad, but at the end they changed meaning. I really liked the Inuit throwing out their elderly. They sat on warm seats and watched tv, so it was a symbol of retirement and how we want to get rid of our useless grannys. I guess, if you watch it again and you know it is a dream, it plays very differently. Every nation was build on cliches American people know about them plus American way of life elements and fears of different countries. It was a childs mind from the beginning to the end. And I like the morale.

  2. 12:41

    I laughed so hard that my teeth vibrated.

  3. Never even heard of this until seeing this review. It looks so weird that I kinda can’t believe that it exists.

    Top 2 funniest Critic comments are:

    Who owns this pants factory? Willy Wonka?

    Yeah, along with all the other great lessons of this movie: Take rides from strangers, especially if they dress up like the Easter Bunny.

  4. You know, I actually really like this movie. It’s the only movie to have EVER done the ‘It was all a dream’ ending WELL. That is to say, through most of the movie you think you’re watching a slightly insipid but AMUSINGLY HORRIFIC twisted family flick; and then the ending twist hits. Looking back, it’s a really good portrayal of how an egotistical, not too bright, and neglected kid might subconsciously regard the world: races consisting of half-remembered facts rather than people, landscapes filtered through the familiar constructs of suburbia, and all about him. It makes the movie a character study, showing what this kid is really like with no societal barriers; and shows him working through the problem of being underappreciated subconsciously, before he can return home. The southern family shows the potential disaster of parents taking too much interest in his development, the Inuits the theoretical issue of parents too different from the boring standard he has, the Hawaiins the danger of parents who appreciate what he already is TOO much, and the perfect family showing that even without all that he still loved his real parents more. It’s a story of realizing that the imperfect life you have isn’t one to discard.

    But I can totally understand the hate, if the humor doesn’t hit the ‘so unfunny it’s funny again’ sweet spot; the time taken in GETTING to the recontextualisation is liable to get the movie an early judging of horrific.

  5. I will admit that I laughed at that bit about the signboard, but that was only because Elijah Wood pulled off such a great outraged tone.

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